RGD peptide‐conjugated poly(dimethylsiloxane) promotes adhesion, proliferation, and collagen secretion of human fibroblasts

Bin Li

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

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Jianxin Chen

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

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James H.‐C. Wang

Corresponding Author

E-mail address: wanghc@pitt.edu

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213

MechanoBiology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213Search for more papers by this author
First published: 31 August 2006
Cited by: 59

Abstract

A novel technique for conjugating Arg‐Gly‐Asp (RGD) peptides to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces as well as its application to cell culture is presented in this paper. This technique performs RGD conjugation to PDMS through photochemical immobilization of functional NHS groups to PDMS surface followed with linking RGD peptide to the surface via coupling reaction with NHS. A bifunctional photolinker, N‐sulfosuccinimidyl‐6‐(4′‐azido‐2′‐nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (sulfo‐SANPAH), was used to conjugate RGD peptide to the surface. Compared to existing methods for peptide conjugation to PDMS, this technique is convenient, efficient, and free of organic contamination to PDMS surfaces. It can also be used to conjugate other peptides or proteins to most polymeric materials. In addition, cell culture studies showed that the RGD‐conjugated PDMS surfaces promoted the adhesion, proliferation, and collagen production of human skin fibroblasts (HSFs). Finally, the RGD‐conjugated PDMS surfaces are resistant to autoclaving and UV irradiation, which enables them to be repeatedly used in cell culture studies. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2006

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